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art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier
There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 
A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.
The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.
Anatomy of the Blade
The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.
Tang
At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.
Ricasso
The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.
Blade
The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.
Edge
The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).
Point
The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.
Strong
The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.
Weak
The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.
Anatomy of the Guard
The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.
Pommel
A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.
Turk’s Head
A spacer between the counter weight and handle.
Handle
The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.
Crossbar Block
The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.
Crossbar
The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.
Sweepings
The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.
Knuckle Guard
Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.
Cup
The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

art-of-swords:

Anatomy of the Rapier

There are a lot of things that could be said and mentioned here, the rapier being quite a complex weapon, but this short and quick presentation should do. 

A rapier is a long, straight-bladed cut-and-thrust single-handed sword optimized for the thrust and featuring a guard that affords good protection to the hand; the rapier sees its apogee between the last third of the Sixteenth Century and the end of the Seventeenth.

The rapier anatomy of the rapier is broken into two distinct parts: The blade, and the guard.

  • Anatomy of the Blade

The blade of the rapier describes the long sharpened piece of metal which all the other parts surround or attach.

  • Tang

At the base of the rapier blade is the tang, which is a long tongue of metal that descends into the guard and ends at the pommel which is screwed onto threading or attached more permanently through [peening] or welding.

  • Ricasso

The unsharpened section of the blade beginning immediately after the tang. When placing a guard onto the blade, the crossbar block slides over the tang and then rests against the ricasso, preventing it from sliding further down the blade. The ricasso can extend from the crossbar block to the outer sweepings or guard shell (meaning the sharpened or more tapered edge of the blade begins immediately after the guard) or further down the length of the blade. The edges of the blade at the ricasso are square/flat.

  • Blade

The sharpened part of the blade is generally what is referred to when speaking of the ‘blade’. This part begins after the ricasso and is the part of the sword used for striking and defending.

  • Edge

The edge of the blade is oriented with the crossbar of the guard and aligns with the knuckle of the hand when holding the sword so that the knuckles lead the edge. On a rapier there are two edges that you can identify when it is held: the true edge (on the same side as your knuckles) and the false edge (on the same side as the base of your thumb).

  • Point

The part of the blade opposite the tang and pommel that is used for penetrating the opponent.

  • Strong

The lower half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for defense. In Italian the Forte.

  • Weak

The upper half of the exposed rapier blade, generally used for offense (cutting and thrusting). In Italian the Debole.

  • Anatomy of the Guard

The guard of the rapier is the part that protects the sword hand of the wielder.

  • Pommel

A counter weight at the base of the blade, just behind the guard.

  • Turk’s Head

A spacer between the counter weight and handle.

  • Handle

The part of the rapier that you hold. Handles can be made of wood, wood wrapped in wire, wood wrapped in leather, and some other materials. Some handles are shaped to provide comfortable grooves for your fingers or provide other handling or comfort characteristics.

  • Crossbar Block

The crossbar block or alternatively the quillion block is a piece of metal that mounts to the blade just above.

  • Crossbar

The crossbar or quillions are a rod that extend perpendicular to the blade, on either side, and are used for protecting the hand, binding blades, and deflecting the sword of the opponent.

  • Sweepings

The rings and other rods that make up the guard and protect the hand.

  • Knuckle Guard

Sometimes referred to as the knuckle bow, the knuckle guard is a bar or bars of metal that extend down in front of the sword hand, protecting the knuckles. The knuckle guard can be used to identify the true edge of the sword.

  • Cup

The cup or shell is a solid plate of dished metal that surrounds the hand, typically in place of the sweepings, but sometimes in combination on some guards.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Western Martial Arts Wikia

, #Weapon #Sword #Rapier
Anonymous:
So, I've been looking through your tutorials, specifically the one on skin. I think it's great- it's really good and explains stuff really well (all your tutorials do :) ),but I was having some trouble understanding undertones. How do you identify somebody's undertones? I get it in the general sense, but how can you tell that it will be this shade of a color vs another shade? Thanks so much, you're a huge inspiration and your artwork gets better each time! -anna

peaceofseoul:

Hi! I’m glad the tutorials are helpful!

So, at first glance, its not hard to estimate an undertoneBut it also really helps to use the colour picker  in the most saturated parts of the face (Neither in light or shadow) 

Especially in pictures like these try to avoid the contour area just around the outside edges of the apples of the cheeks incase the model is wearing a lot of blush. Any natural makeup such as foundation or bronzer is fine because it should match the natural colours of the face, unlike blush which is usually a different colour.

These are the colours I picked from the faces. (you can also just eyeball them)

You can use these as your base tones when you paint, but knowing the actual undertone can give the skin a more unified and continuous look. So take the colour you took from the photo and use the full colour adjuster/ picker thing to find the undertone (again, you can just eyeball it unless you want to be super precise).

Some of the colours you find may seem really different from the original image, that’s okay! The colour should represent the mood or the essence of the face, the undertone can be any colour imaginable and one person can have more than one undertone depending on the lighting or the mood you want the piece to have. Giving someone a green or blue undertone can make them look sick. Giving someone a orange or red undertone can make them look warm and inviting. Its up to you! Just having an undertone in your art can make a piece look more realistic and give your art a larger range of skin tones.

Once you do this enough times it becomes a lot easier to eyeball the undertones and make them up for original drawings and characters. Do whatever feels right!

I hope this helps!

, #digital #digital painting #digital painting tutorial #painting #painting tutorial #tutorial #tutorials #color #color tutorial #coloring tutorial #skin tutorial #skin
Anonymous:
I'm writing a story that takes place in a mostly white community, and while I want to include POC characters, I want to avoid any token characters. Thoughts?

Admin Junko here!

Avoiding token characters is a good thing. When you use a Token character, it’s when they are the only Marginalized person (Black, Native American, Gay, Disabled, etc, etc, etc) among the (usual) white (straight, cisgender, able-bodied, etc, etc) protagonists.

Even having One East Asian, One South East Asian, One Black Person and One Native American in a group of all white friends can be subjected to tokenism if they do not stand unique against the white cast.

Token characters also exhibit stereotypical behavior (“Guuuurl~” or “Yo~ That’s what’s up!” for Black characters, painfully flamboyant behavior for Gay Cis-males, etc, etc, etc)  when written by those outside of said race or marginalized groups.

I live in a mostly white community (before then, i lived in a predominantly Black city for all my life). While I see White people a lot; it’s not unusual or uncommon for me to see other PoC when I go to work or even in my neighborhood. I can count how many Black families there are (including my own). I do believe there’s at least 7 black families in my subdivision alone. While those Black families might not have a horrible experience here, we’re not monolith. Our experiences with dealing with a mostly White community will be different.

But also ask yourself: Why a mostly white community? If it’s because you want to base it on a real life city that’s mostly white, I don’t think anyone will get on your case as long as you extensively do research about Race relations in said City (race relations, race demographics and such ARE important, especially if based in the real world and not a fantasy world).

If it’s because you yourself are in a mostly white city and only know that experience, it can get problematic because you being in a white city and/or being white; you’ve not had many relationships with PoC and can definitely fall victim of Tokenism. You’ve not been able to expand your awareness at all and probably were only exposed to PoC on Tv or once in a while at a grocery store.

But the biggest part of avoiding Tokenism: Treat your Characters of Color as people. When you treat them as only their skin, race, sexuality, disability, gender; That’s when problems will occur.

Race is an important part of an experience of a PoC; being treated like a person and not as a stereotype is just as important.

I’d also check out “Writing with Color" as well as our writing tag as we have posts that deal with writing characters of Color

If any Admins would like to put their input, please do so!

, #Admin Junko #askspam #Anonymous
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